2018-05-10 / News

Inspired Robowolves capture Lego international award


The Jamestown Robowolves celebrate a successful run on the game board during the FIRST Championship last month in Detroit. The Jamestown Robowolves celebrate a successful run on the game board during the FIRST Championship last month in Detroit. More than 15,000 students on 700 teams from 37 countries competed at the FIRST Championship in Detroit, a four-day robotics tournament that culminated with hardware for three local girls.

The Jamestown Robowolves won the global competition’s inspiration award from a division of 104 teams during the April 24-27 event. The honor celebrates the team that displays extraordinary enthusiasm while motivating opponents through their actions. It also recognizes students who are empowered by the competition.

The Robowolves consist of Lawn School seventh-grader Eva Junge and North Kingstown freshmen Ella Junge and Audrey Raupp, both 2017 Lawn graduates. They are coached by Paulette Junge and Deb Raupp. During their five-year reign, the team has won two state championships (2016, 2018) and was given the project award at the 2016 Arkansas Razorback Invitational. Coupled with Sunday’s honor, they are the first Jamestown team to win top honors at two international competitions, according to parent Michael Junge, who acts as team administrator.


Ella Junge, from left, Audrey Raupp and Eva Junge with the inspiration award they won at the international competition. Ella Junge, from left, Audrey Raupp and Eva Junge with the inspiration award they won at the international competition. This season’s theme was hydrodynamics, which tasked students with researching ways to improve the human water cycle while building robots to accomplish these plans. According to the coaches, the three girls each brought a different perspective to the competition. Ella is in her third year mentoring elementary students on robotics at Melrose School, which gives her the unique ability to deal with competition like a teacher. Her younger sister, Eva, is the lead programmer who also produced the team’s informational videos, which boast more than 4,000 views on YouTube. And Audrey brings the arts and enthusiasm to the team with a constant reminder that the program is about more than robots.

Along with their own success, the girls mentored Lawn School team System Overdrive, which won the research award at the 2018 state championships, the same award won by the Robowolves in the previous year. All three girls are retiring from FIRST Lego League competition but will continue to volunteer and mentor younger students as they advance to the next level of robotics.

FIRST Lego League introduces students to real-world engineering challenges by inviting them to conduct research projects and build Lego-based autonomous robots to complete tasks on a thematic playing surface. The teams, guided by their imaginations, discover exciting career possibilities and learn to make positive contributions to society. This season’s challenge tasked more than 280,000 students on 35,226 teams representing nearly 90 countries with improving the human water cycle.

Top honors in Detroit went to Not the Droids You’re Looking For, a Pittsburgh team that edged out a Canadian team and a Japanese team for the champion’s award.

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